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Nobody Rides for Free

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An American Dilemma

Here’s what I’ve noticed about Americans. This has been commonplace my whole lifetime. People always moan about inadequate services. They want better roads, schools, police protection, healthcare, and what. That’s understandable, yet what baffles me is nobody wants to pay any taxes to fund them. They all want something for nothing. Sorry to burst your bubble, folks, but that’s not how the universe works. Barry Commoner comprised the Four Laws of Ecology. One of them states, “Nobody gets a free lunch. There is no such thing as a free lunch.” I had fallout with one of my long-term friends over this. If it were up to me, everybody would have universal healthcare and free education from preschool all the way through postgraduate school. My former companion argued both cost too much. Her rationale is that college and healthcare prices would spike while the quality would go down if they were available to everyone. What do you expect from someone who watches FOX News?

Get Your Priorities Straight

I can promise the reader with a capital P it costs less to provide those to each person who can’t afford it than it does to house non-violent prison inmates in private prisons for one year. I imagine the folks who rebuke these ideas the same idiots who believe schools are socially engineering children. The price would be infinitesimal compared to what it would to build an aircraft carrier, fighter plane, or even a high-tech missile. Funny how you never hear the alt-right moan about pork-barrel defense spending. What do they care as long as it’s not their children sent to die so corporate fat cats can get wealthier? The American government throws $38 billion a-year to Israel, a country with universal healthcare and free post-secondary education.

No Taxes, No Government, No Service

This conversation I had with a German friend two years ago. She elucidated how Germans see it as their civic duty to pay taxes. They assert they’re doing a community service. They have the right attitude in my book. Where this aversion towards paying taxes in America began I don’t know, but it’s a paradox to say the least. The Libertarian ideology exacerbates that mindset. Thus, I find their philosophies more impractical than those of the GOP. You cannot have limited government in a country with over 300 million people; especially, when that nation is the world superpower and breadbasket of the global economy. The concept sounds sexy on paper, but it’s asinine in reality. We’re not settlers on the frontier anymore. The manifest destiny, Civil War, and Revolutionary War ended centuries ago. We’ve moved past that phase (at least I hope we did.)

Don’t Tread On Me

The Tea Party movement which began in 2009 was never about standing up to government tyranny. That was a carte blanche they used to express their disgust over a black man in the White House. Funny how we haven’t heard anything about them since Barack Obama left office. Their principles were misguided and misplaced. The original Tea Party revolted over the taxation of commoners in colonial New England and the misappropriation of funding towards the British crown. That’s no different than trickle down economics and tax cuts for the rich. Last time I checked, America is no longer part of the British commonwealth. As I said, it was nothing more than a smoke-and-mirrors campaign to disguise their prejudices towards a black President. Funny how Ted Cruz, a Canadian-born half-Cuban, spearheaded the birther movement.

Offshore is Off the Mark

There is a flip side to this coin. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez meant well when she proposed taxing the top bracket at 70-percent. My former friend is right about one thing. If they start taxing the wealthy that much, more millionaires and billionaires will try to safeguard their money in offshore accounts. That’s why I think Congress should impose the Tobin and Spahn taxes before they do anything. The Tobin tax, named for James Tobin, charges transaction taxes from offshore accounts plus whatever the individual owes in income taxes. The Spahn tax, named in honor of Eugen Spahn, is the corporate version. That way, Covfefe, Mitt Romney, and other tax dodgers will think twice next time they have overseas accounts. Traveling back and forth to Switzerland, the Cayman Islands, or wherever can be time-consuming and costly after awhile. Not to mention, there’s a maximum amount of cash one can bring through US customs before being spotted by the IRS.

The Path of Least Resistance

Most rich people will take the cheapest option. Therefore, I feel it’s imperative to implement these practices. This I suspect would pay off large chunks of the national debt. I don’t know for sure if they have the Tobin and Spahn taxes in the Scandinavian countries, so don’t quote me on this. I believe that’s why Ingvar Kamprad, the CEO of IKEA, moved their headquarters from Stockholm to Amsterdam, and Kamprad himself moved to Switzerland. Bjorn Borg changed his residency to Monte Carlo after he won the Grand Slam Tournament to avoid taxes in Sweden and later returned to Stockholm when he retired so he could reap the benefits. That was mighty white of him. I surmise this is why Dolph Lundgren lived in Spain for many years, but there’s no way to prove that. For all we know, Lundgren resided there because Spain has a warm climate and averages over 300 annual days of sunshine unlike Sweden where it gets dark and cold throughout the winter. You can’t fault him for that.

Bye-Bye Miss American Pie

Too often I look pie charts regarding the budget, and it shows misleading information about social security. Medicare and social security are funding by taxpayers not the government. The pie charts are made by conservatives to fool viewers into thinking those are burdens on society in lieu of priorities. That leads me to my last solution. I’d force the government to pass a constitutional amendment mandating all government programs receive equal funding. The powers that be would spend the same amount on education, healthcare, infrastructure, energy, science, housing, VA benefits, transportation, etc., that it does on defense were it up to me. Further, I’d pass another bill requiring Congress to raise taxes ten percent and require the children of congressmen, defense contractors, and war financiers to be drafted into military service whenever war is declared. No matter what, wouldn’t be allowed to take funding from education, healthcare, or any other service and pour it into defense. That would make them think twice about committing career suicide like. My senior year in college, a well-seasoned professor of mine stated, “Democracy works best when all the goods are equitably distributed.” About that he was right as rain.

That’s Gonna Cost You

Congress must impose the Tobin and Spahn taxes before they raise income taxes on the top tier. That first part is imperative. Further, I insist they induce an expatriation tax for someone who tries something cute moving abroad to avoid taxes while consulting one’s business on American soil. I even condone there being an outsource tax and massive tariffs on American products manufactured overseas. The government I feel should raise the latter as high as 150-percent if necessary. Basically, I’d raise them to where it would be more expensive to outsource labor and slap CEO’s with hefty fines should they pull a dick move like that. No longer would businesses or owners be allowed use travel expenses and company expenses as tax write-offs. Freedom isn’t free. That’s the part Libertarians and tax dodgers have a hard time registering through their thick noggins. They reinforce that sense of entitlement Americans have. Perhaps they should change the laws to where people had to pay weekly or biweekly income taxes to close all the loopholes. Here is what the income tax code would look like if it were up to me:

Income Tax Brackets Based on Annual Salaries as Head of Household During Time of Peace and/or Economic Boom
Less than $15,000 = 10%
$15,000 – $30,000 = 11%
$30,000 – $45,000 = 12%
$45,000 – $60,000 = 13%
$60,000 – $75,000 = 14%
$75,000 – $90,000 = 15%
$90,000 – $105,000 = 16%
$105,000 – $120,000 = 17%
$120,000 – $135,000 = 18%
$135,000 – $150,000 = 19%
$150,000 – $165,000 = 20%
$165,000 – $180,000 = 21%
$180,000 – $205,000 = 22%
$205,000 – $220,000 = 23%
$220,000 – $235,000 = 24%
$235,000 – $250,000 = 25%
$250,000 – $265,000 = 26%
$265,000 – $280,000 = 27%
$280,000 – $295,000 = 28%
$295,000 – $310,000 = 29%
$310,000 – $325,000 = 30%
$325,000 – $340,000 = 31%
$340,000 – $355,000 = 32%
$355,000 – $370,000 = 33%
$370,000 – $385,000 = 34%
$385,000 – $400,000 = 35%
$400,000 – $415,000 = 36%
$415,000 – $430,000 = 37%
$430,000 – $445,000 = 38%
$445,000 – $460,000 = 39%
$460,000 – $475,000 = 40%
$475,000 – $490,000 = 41%
$490,000 – $505,000 = 42%
$505,000 – $520,000 = 43%
$520,000 – $535,000 = 44%
$535,000 – $550,000 = 45%
$550,000 – $575,000 = 46%
$575,000 – $590,000 = 47%
$590,000 – $605,000 = 48%
$605,000 – $620,000 = 49%
$620,000 and more = 50%

Income Tax Brackets Based on Annual Salaries as Head of Household During Time of War and/or Economic Recession
Less than $15,000 = 10%
$15,000 – $30,000 = 11%
$30,000 – $45,000 = 12%
$45,000 – $60,000 = 13%
$60,000 – $75,000 = 14%
$75,000 – $90,000 = 15%
$90,000 – $105,000 = 16%
$105,000 – $120,000 = 17%
$120,000 – $135,000 = 18%
$135,000 – $150,000 = 19%
$150,000 – $165,000 = 20%
$165,000 – $180,000 = 21%
$180,000 – $205,000 = 22%
$205,000 – $220,000 = 23%
$220,000 – $235,000 = 24%
$235,000 – $250,000 = 25%
$250,000 – $265,000 = 26%
$265,000 – $280,000 = 27%
$280,000 – $295,000 = 28%
$295,000 – $310,000 = 29%
$310,000 – $325,000 = 30%
$325,000 – $340,000 = 31%
$340,000 – $355,000 = 32%
$355,000 – $370,000 = 33%
$370,000 – $385,000 = 34%
$385,000 – $400,000 = 35%
$400,000 – $415,000 = 36%
$415,000 – $430,000 = 37%
$430,000 – $445,000 = 38%
$445,000 – $460,000 = 39%
$460,000 – $475,000 = 40%
$475,000 – $490,000 = 41%
$490,000 – $505,000 = 42%
$505,000 – $520,000 = 43%
$520,000 – $535,000 = 44%
$535,000 – $550,000 = 45%
$550,000 – $575,000 = 46%
$575,000 – $590,000 = 47%
$590,000 – $605,000 = 48%
$605,000 – $620,000 = 49%
$620,000 – $635,000 = 50%
$635,000 – $650.000 = 51%
$650.000 – $665,000 = 52%
$665,000 – $680,000 = 53%
$680,000 – $695,000 = 54%
$695,000 – $710.000 = 55%
$710,000 – $725,000 = 56%
$725,000 – $740,000 = 57%
$740,000 – $755,000 = 58%
$755,000 – $770,000 = 59%
$770,000 – $785,000 = 60%
$785,000 – $800,000 = 61%
$800,000 – $815,000 = 62%
$815,000 – $830,000 = 63%
$830,000 – $845,000 = 64%
$845,000 – $860,000 = 65%
$860,000 – $875,000 = 66%
$875,000 – $890,000 = 67$
$890,000 – $905,000 = 68%
$905,000 – $920,000 = 69%
$920,000 – $935,000 = 70%
$935,000 – $950,000 = 71%
$950,000 – $965,000 = 72%
$965,000 – $980,000 = 73%
$980,000 – $995,000 = 74%
$995,000 and more = 75%

Income Tax Brackets Based for Married Individuals on Joint Returns During Time of Peace and/or Economic Boom
Less than $20,000 = 10%
$20,000 – $40,000 = 11%
$40,000 – $60,000 = 12%
$60,000 – $80.000 = 13%
$80,000 – $100,000 = 14%
$100,000 – $120,000 = 15%
$120,000 – $140,000 = 16%
$140,000 – $160,000 = 17%
$160,000 – $180,000 = 18%
$180.000 – $200,000 = 19%
$200,000 – $220,000 = 20%
$220,000 – $240,000 = 21%
$240,000 – $260,000 = 22%
$260,000 – $280,000 = 23%
$280.000 – $300,000 = 24%
$300,000 – $320,000 = 25%
$320,000 – $340,000 = 26%
$340,000 – $360,000 = 27%
$360,000 – $380,000 = 28%
$380,000 – $400,000 = 29%
$400,000 – $420,000 = 30%
$420,000 – $440,000 = 31%
$440,000 – $460,000 = 32%
$460,000 – $480,000 = 33%
$480,000 – $500,000 = 34%
$500,000 – $520,000 = 35%
$520,000 – $540,000 = 36%
$540,000 – $560,000 = 37%
$560.000 – $580,000 = 38%
$580,000 – $600,000 = 39%
$600,000 – $620,000 = 40%
$620.000 – $640,000 = 41%
$640,000 – $660,000 = 42%
$660,000 – $680,000 = 43%
$680,000 – $700,000 = 44%
$700,000 – $720,000 = 45%
$720,000 – $740,000 = 46%
$740,000 – $760,000 = 47%
$760,000 – $780,000 = 48%
$780,000 – $800,000 = 49%
$800,000 and more = 50%

Income Tax Brackets Based for Married Individuals on Joint Returns During Time of War and/or Economic Recession
Less than $20,000 = 10%
$20,000 – $40,000 = 11%
$40,000 – $60,000 = 12%
$60,000 – $80.000 = 13%
$80,000 – $100,000 = 14%
$100,000 – $120,000 = 15%
$120,000 – $140,000 = 16%
$140,000 – $160,000 = 17%
$160,000 – $180,000 = 18%
$180.000 – $200,000 = 19%
$200,000 – $220,000 = 20%
$220,000 – $240,000 = 21%
$240,000 – $260,000 = 22%
$260,000 – $280,000 = 23%
$280.000 – $300,000 = 24%
$300,000 – $320,000 = 25%
$320,000 – $340,000 = 26%
$340,000 – $360,000 = 27%
$360,000 – $380,000 = 28%
$380,000 – $400,000 = 29%
$400,000 – $420,000 = 30%
$420,000 – $440,000 = 31%
$440,000 – $460,000 = 32%
$460,000 – $480,000 = 33%
$480,000 – $500,000 = 34%
$500,000 – $520,000 = 35%
$520,000 – $540,000 = 36%
$540,000 – $560,000 = 37%
$560.000 – $580,000 = 38%
$580,000 – $600,000 = 39%
$600,000 – $620,000 = 40%
$620.000 – $640,000 = 41%
$640,000 – $660,000 = 42%
$660,000 – $680,000 = 43%
$680,000 – $700,000 = 44%
$700,000 – $720,000 = 45%
$720,000 – $740,000 = 46%
$740,000 – $760,000 = 47%
$760,000 – $780,000 = 48%
$780,000 – $800,000 = 49%
$800,000 – $820,000 = 50%
$820,000 – $840,000 = 51%
$840,000 – $860,000 = 52%
$860,000 – $880,000 = 53%
$880,000 – $900,000 = 54%
$900,000 – $920,000 = 55%
$920,000 – $940,000 = 56%
$940,000 – $960,000 = 57%
$960,000 – $980,000 = 58%
$980,000 – $1,000,000 = 59%
$1,000,000 – $1,020,000 = 60%
$1,020,000 – $1,040,000 = 61%
$1,040,000 – $1,060,000 = 62%
$1,060,000 – $1,080,000 = 63%
$1,080,000 – $1,100,000 = 64%
$1,100,000 – $1,120,000 = 65%
$1,120,000 – $1,140,000 = 66%
$1,140,000 – $1,160,000 = 67%
$1,160,000 – $1,180,000 = 68%
$1,180,000 – $1,200,000 = 69%
$1,200,000 – $1,220,000 = 70%
$1,220,000 – $1,240,000 = 71%
$1,240,000 – $1,260,000 = 72%
$1,260,000 – $1,280,000 = 73%
$1,280,000 – $1,300,000 = 74%
$1,300,000 and more = 75%

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